1. 04:16 14th Sep 2014

    Notes: 191509

    Reblogged from makingacynicsmile

    
"Shall we order dessert?"
"No thanks… i’m stuffed.

    "Shall we order dessert?"

    "No thanks… i’m stuffed.

     
  2. 03:50

    Notes: 823

    Reblogged from interstellar-soviet

    rtlstuff:

    *sweats nervously*

     
  3. 03:49

    Notes: 876

    Reblogged from slowartday

    hifructosemag:

    Joaquin Jara paints, he sculpts, and he intervenes. His work is baroque, moody. It’s not morose as much as it’s inevitable. It’s based on an ashes-to-ashes-dust-to-dust esthetic. Art may be long, as the expression goes, but there’s nothing permanent about the organic process each piece describes. Read more on Hi-Fructose. 

     
  4. 15:09 9th Sep 2014

    Notes: 17795

    Reblogged from unlobolunatico

    think-thank-thunk:

Me flirting

    think-thank-thunk:

    Me flirting

     
  5. 15:08

    Notes: 298

    Reblogged from fabriciomora

    image: Download

    fabriciomora:

Brasilia National Stadium - gmp architekten 
     
  6.  
  7. 01:23

    Notes: 2449

    Reblogged from interstellar-soviet

    Tags: historical materialism

    paul-von-hindenburg said: Who would win in a fistfight, Marx or Lenin?

    friendshipandlabor:

    This is the purpose of historical materialism. This is what everything’s been about. Let’s get to it. 

    Alright I googled “Vladimir Lenin height and weight” and got directed to this guardian article. Assuming this information is true (I know, it’s The Guardian), Lenin was 5’5”, 165 lbs. I tried googling for Marx’s height/weight but didn’t find any direct results. However, one Yahoo Answers user described him as being of “average height” and referred to this website which posted the following quote: 

    Marx greatly impressed as all. He was of medium height, broad-shouldered, powerful in build, and vigorous in his movements. His forehead was high and finely shaped, his hair thick and pitch-black, his gaze piercing. Marx was a born leader of the people. His speech was brief, convincing and compelling in its logic. He never said a superfluous word; every sentence contained an idea and every idea was an essential link in the chain of his argument.

    So Marx was definitely medium height. We should then be able to reasonably infer his height from looking at whatever that medium height was, right? According to these definitely infallible statistics provided by ChaCha, the average height and weight for a man in the 1840’s was 5’6” and 140-160 lbs. So let’s say Marx was 5’6” and 160. He has an inch on Lenin, but concedes five pounds. What’s more significant here? Is an inch worth more or less than five pounds in weight? I can’t answer this right now, I’m only on the second chapter of Capital

    Here’s a description of Lenin on his wikipedia article

    Concerned with physical fitness, he took regular exercise,[243] enjoyed cycling, swimming, and shooting,[244] also developed a passion for mountain walking in the Swiss peaks.

    So Lenin kept in shape. 

    Unfortunately, “broad-shouldered and powerful in build” is much vaguer than that. I do feel comfortable asserting that Lenin would definitely win a fight against Marx with a gray beard. Young Marx vs Prime Lenin would be a good contest.

    But here’s what really matters: Mao was 5’10” and 190 (according to this site which otherwise just slanders him) and worked on his father’s farm in youth, walked a shit ton and loved to swim. He has 4/5 inches and 25/30 pounds on them. Mao would wreck them both and this is why Maoism is the necessary development of Marxism-Leninism.

     
  8. image: Download

    juliedillon:

This is an illustration I did for the August 2014 issue of Popular Science Magazine. The assignment was to show a scifi take on human aging in the future. I wanted to do something relatively positive, so I drew a lady whose life has been been prolonged through cybernetic enhancements and augmentation, so she gets to spend time with her great-great-great-great grandchildren. 
Thanks to AD Michelle Mruk!

    juliedillon:

    This is an illustration I did for the August 2014 issue of Popular Science Magazine. The assignment was to show a scifi take on human aging in the future. I wanted to do something relatively positive, so I drew a lady whose life has been been prolonged through cybernetic enhancements and augmentation, so she gets to spend time with her great-great-great-great grandchildren. 

    Thanks to AD Michelle Mruk!

     
  9. 14:23 6th Sep 2014

    Notes: 184199

    Reblogged from purizumu-boi

    (Source: sizvideos)

     
  10.  
  11. 13:52 22nd Aug 2014

    Notes: 438

    Reblogged from archatlas

    archatlas:

    ad rem Akzidenz aka Philipp Bolthausen

    "My works aren’t pictures of something, but objects about something."

     
  12. 11:40

    Notes: 180162

    Reblogged from mitchellyasui

    khaleesri:

    "no homo" I whisper as I look at my garden of pea plants. The progeny had expressed a 1:2:1 ratio of phenotypes. I am Gregor Mendel. 

    (Source: rianderthal)

     
  13. 22:34 20th Aug 2014

    Notes: 3637

    Reblogged from timid-icarus

    post-impressionisms:

    I love art - no.41

    Ivan Aivazovsky, Ukrainian  (1835—1899).

     
  14. 20:34 19th Aug 2014

    Notes: 4844

    Reblogged from interstellar-soviet

    1. liberal: um has this revolution been approved by the state?
     
  15. 20:34

    Notes: 89

    Reblogged from life-of-an-architecture-student

    image: Download